«

»

Nov 27

Albany Loves Loving Work

Fran Rossi Szpylczyn blogged about my book at There Will Be Bread her amazing spirituality blog at the Times Union in Albany. She talks about her own struggle with career change.

Let me be clear – I did not hate my old job, in fact, I loved many things about it, especially the people the people that I worked with. However, in my new job, despite the lack of prestige, pay and privacy, I could not be happier. I am loving work. And loving work is also what I do, because the work of the church is to love. This makes me one very lucky person!

Spiritual director, campus minister, and author Mike Hayes explores this kind of transformation – and how others might set about doing the same thing, in his latest book, Loving Work. (Orbis, $16.00, 120 pp.) For Hayes, it is not just about loving what you do, but it is about being who you are – and that includes bringing loving into the work that you choose to do.

In full disclosure, Mike is a friend, and I was asked to provide a cover blurb, which I will restate here. After reading the book I said, “Some books are kept for a long time, because they nourish the soul or they are practical guides… Mike Hayes offers us both things with great wisdom in a book that you will want to keep.”

Infused with sound Ignatian spirituality, warmth, wisdom, humor and a tremendous amount of insight, this book offers a way forward to better work – and a much better life. Whether pointing to practical details and planning, or focusing on our relationship with God, we are shown the value of the importance of seeking work that feeds the soul, as well as work that creates our living. What struck me most is the no-nonsense approach that Hayes’ employs, which is direct, yet incredibly human at the same time. His experiences in business, spiritual direction, and campus ministry are all pressed into excellent use in this book.

One of my favorite chapters is called, “If You Could Be Anything.” Sparing no details, Hayes discusses his own crisis of the heart with clarity. Despite his successful (and longed for) career in radio broadcasting, something is just missing. No stranger to the world of faith, his two worlds begin to align as he explores his own “anything.” The results have led him to where he is today.

These are tough times, and getting a new job is not all that easy. And perhaps that is what makes this book more important than ever. If we can’t really achieve what we thought was our dream, perhaps that should truly compel us to discern and claim what our true work might be. Risky? Sure. But if we don’t try, how do we ever know the greatness that we are called to?

Amen! Couldn’t have said it better myself. Ignatius reminds us that we are not merely to “follow our heart”. Rather, our hearts inform our heads and that helps us to make a more informed decision in finding out what will best suit our personality in terms of finding work that we love.

I loved writing this book and reflecting on it this semester has renewed my own love of my work. This has been a great semester that will soon come to close and it reminds me how exciting ministry can be.

So thanks for the plug, Fran and for the morning reflection. Fran’s giving away a copy of my book, so if you don’t have your copy yet—head on over to her blog and try to win one or just head to Amazon and buy one for everyone in your family for Christmas so they can make great New Year’s Resolutions.

Tweet

Post to Twitter

Leave a Reply

Social Widgets powered by AB-WebLog.com.

View Mobile Site
%d bloggers like this: